Here’s few of the usual equivalent Oracle data functions in MySQL.

DATE ADD (SYSDATE +/-1)

SELECT DATE_ADD(SYSDATE(),INTERVAL 1 DAY);
SELECT DATE_ADD(SYSDATE(),INTERVAL -10 DAY);


ADD_MONTHS

SELECT DATE_ADD(SYSDATE(),INTERVAL 1 MONTH);

TRUNC()

SELECT DATE(SYSDATE());

TO_DATE()

SELECT STR_TO_DATE( '07-08-2010', '%d-%m-%Y' );

TIME DIFFERENCE

SELECT TIMESTAMPDIFF(
SECOND , '2010-01-07 23:50:59', SYSDATE( ) ) /3600 /24 day,
TIMESTAMPDIFF(
SECOND , '2010-01-07 23:50:59', SYSDATE( ) ) /3600 hours,
TIMESTAMPDIFF(
SECOND , '2010-01-07 23:50:59', SYSDATE( ) ) /60 mins,
TIMESTAMPDIFF(
SECOND , '2010-01-07 23:50:59', SYSDATE( ) ) secs,

In the preceding example, I could have just used HOUR, MINUTE, DAY, MONTH or YEAR interval but in real world, I mostly use SECOND for a more accurate results. That’s not to say timestampdiff is not accurate. Maybe because I’m used in how I do it in Oracle.

MONTHS_BETWEEN

SELECT TIMESTAMPDIFF(
MONTH , '2010-01-07', SYSDATE( ) ) no_months

Specifier Description
%a Abbreviated weekday name (Sun..Sat)
%b Abbreviated month name (Jan..Dec)
%c Month, numeric (0..12)
%D Day of the month with English suffix (0th, 1st, 2nd, 3rd, …)
%d Day of the month, numeric (00..31)
%e Day of the month, numeric (0..31)
%f Microseconds (000000..999999)
%H Hour (00..23)
%h Hour (01..12)
%I Hour (01..12)
%i Minutes, numeric (00..59)
%j Day of year (001..366)
%k Hour (0..23)
%l Hour (1..12)
%M Month name (January..December)
%m Month, numeric (00..12)
%p AM or PM
%r Time, 12-hour (hh:mm:ss followed by AM or PM)
%S Seconds (00..59)
%s Seconds (00..59)
%T Time, 24-hour (hh:mm:ss)
%U Week (00..53), where Sunday is the first day of the week
%u Week (00..53), where Monday is the first day of the week
%V Week (01..53), where Sunday is the first day of the week; used with %X
%v Week (01..53), where Monday is the first day of the week; used with %x
%W Weekday name (Sunday..Saturday)
%w Day of the week (0=Sunday..6=Saturday)
%X Year for the week where Sunday is the first day of the week, numeric, four digits; used with %V
%x Year for the week, where Monday is the first day of the week, numeric, four digits; used with %v
%Y Year, numeric, four digits
%y Year, numeric (two digits)
%% A literal “%” character
%x x, for any “x” not listed above

Reference:
http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.1/en/date-and-time-functions.html

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